• The Bossy Bookworm

Review of The Princess Diarist by Carrie Fisher

I laughed out loud repeatedly at Fisher's good-natured, self-deprecating, and confidently oddball views and contemplations.

The Princess Diarist is based upon the diaries Carrie Fisher kept while she was a young woman stumbling into her iconic lifetime role as Princess Leia.


Fisher is candid, funny, charmingly offbeat, and she's mastered the art of honest self-examination. I loved listening to her fantastically raspy voice as she read her memoir in audiobook form, and I'd love to spend time listening to her no matter what she might be discussing.


Here, Fisher considers the phenomenon of Star Wars, which drew her into its unprecedented whirlwind when she was just nineteen; her middle-aged embracing of Comic-Con, her passionate fans, and the odd familiarity they feel with her because of their love for Leia; and her youthful obsession and affair with the gruff (and married) Harrison Ford, who is a main topic of her teenaged diaries. She hadn't discussed their romantic relationship until this book, and she seems to still be considering its nature (and the mismatch of their personalities and lifestyles) from the vantage point of this moment decades afterward.


I felt like a little too much time may have been spent on sharing youthful poetry and fanciful teenaged musings (in the audiobook these were read by a different, younger person), yet the young Carrie seemed frequently and charmingly self-possessed even as she questioned her own motives, feelings, and life path.


I laughed out loud repeatedly at Fisher's good-natured, self-deprecating, and confidently oddball views and contemplations.

Do you have any Bossy thoughts about this book?

If you love Carrie Fisher, you might also like A Star is Bored, a fictionalized celebrity-focused book written by Carrie Fisher's former personal assistant, Byron Lane. It was fun but also poignant, and I loved it.